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You Asked and Asked, Now It’s Coming: A Septuagint Reader

August 1, 2015

LXX decalOn the one hand, the burgeoning field of Septuagint studies still has few enough publications that any new work is potentially significant. On the other hand, there still seems to be an acute need for works that bridge the gap between New Testament Greek readers and LXX specialists.

Resources like †Rod Decker’s Koine Greek Reader (which pays decent attention to the Septuagint) or even the old Conybeare and Stock (which has some LXX portions with explanatory footnotes) are few and far between.

I’ve been asking Kregel for probably three years now whether they’d consider publishing a dedicated Septuagint reader. Little did I know one was already in the works.

It releases this fall. Karen Jobes is its author. Here’s some copy from Kregel that describes the book:

Interest in the Septuagint today is strong and continues to grow. But a guidebook to the text, similar to readers and handbooks that exist for students of the Greek New Testament, has been lacking. Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader fills that need. Created by an expert on the Septuagint, this groundbreaking resource draws on the editor’s experience as an educator to help upper-level college, seminary, and graduate students cultivate skill in reading the Greek Old Testament.

This reader presents, in canonical order, ten Greek texts from the Göttingen Septuaginta Vetus Testamentum Graecum and the Rahlfs-Hanhart Septuaginta critical edition. It explains the syntax, grammar, and vocabulary of more than 700 verses from select Old Testament texts representing a variety of genres, including the Psalms, the Prophets, and more.

The texts included in this volume were chosen to fit into a 15-week semester, reading about 50 verses a week. The texts selected 1) Are examples of distinctive Septuagint syntax or word usage and/or 2) Exemplify the amplification of certain theological themes or motifs by the Septuagint translators within their Jewish Hellenistic culture and/or 3) Are used significantly by New Testament writers.

More specifically:

  • Each study includes:
    • Introduction—briefly discussing the particular Greek text and its key features.
    • English translation—using the New English Translation of the Septuagint.
    • Text notes—providing verse/phrase–level explanations of the Greek syntax and grammar.
    • Use in the New Testament.
    • Select bibliography.
  • Parses more difficult verbal forms, gives alternate ways of reading the text, and discusses significant critical issues of the text.
  • Calls attention to vocabulary and syntax unique to the Septuagint.
  • References standard Septuagint grammars, lexicons, and other resources.

No cover art yet, but the book is a-coming. You’ll hear more here later.

13 Comments leave one →
  1. August 1, 2015 2:38 pm

    Great news! But I wonder if TOO MANY helps are provided! Includes the NETS plus grammar notes!!??? What is there left for my students to do?

    • August 1, 2015 3:07 pm

      I wonder if the English translation will be set off from the Greek, like maybe in the back of the book? What you could have your students do is work together on a full Reader’s LXX!🙂

  2. August 1, 2015 5:34 pm

    Awesome! Look forward to working through this!

  3. kmpenner permalink
    August 2, 2015 6:55 am

    Is it “Discovering” or “Exploring”?

    • August 2, 2015 7:13 am

      I’ve seen Prof. Jobes mention it as “Exploring” in a couple places, but the text description I received a couple weeks ago from Kregel (upcoming catalog copy) has “Discovering,” which I assume is up-to-date? I don’t know whether anything’s gone to the printers yet, so maybe it can change still.

    • August 3, 2015 9:21 am

      It’s “Discovering.” But “Exploring” was the working title.

  4. August 2, 2015 8:06 am

    Reblogged this on Zwinglius Redivivus and commented:
    Fun.

  5. August 2, 2015 4:50 pm

    Reblogged this on Talmidimblogging.

Trackbacks

  1. The Story on Gender and the NIV (1984), TNIV, and NIV (2011) | Words on the Word
  2. Two Septuagint Studies Classics from Wipf and Stock | Words on the Word
  3. Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader (Jobes) Is Now Available | Words on the Word

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