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Free Copy of Mark (ZECNT) in Print, and 80% Off Ebook Gospel Commentaries from Zondervan

August 8, 2016

Zondervan Matthew Collection

 

Starting August 8 and going until 11:59 (EST) on August 11, Zondervan is offering a host of commentaries on the Gospels at a steep discount. Almost all of them are ones I use regularly in preaching preparation.

Some highlights:

  • Matthew, Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the NT, $7.99 (reviewed here)
  • Scot McKnight’s Commentary on the Sermon on the Mount (The Story of God Bible Commentary, reviewed here)
  • Mark, Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the NT, $7.99 (book note here)
  • NIVAC volumes, including Gary Burge’s volume on John
  • Luke, Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the NT, $7.99 (reviewed here, and I think the first commentary I reviewed for Words on the Word)

Find all the books on sale here.

Mark ZECNT

Up for grabs!

As part of the promotion, Zondervan has given me a print copy of Mark Strauss’s Mark commentary (ZECNT) to give away. It retails at $44.99.

If you’d like to enter for a chance to win the Mark commentary, leave a comment saying which Gospel you find yourself most drawn to and why. If you share a link to this post on Facebook and/or Twitter, you get a second entry. (Make sure you let me know you shared, and leave the link in the comments.)

I’ll announce the winner Friday evening. Check out the whole sale here.

17 Comments leave one →
  1. August 8, 2016 6:54 am

    Reblogged this on Talmidimblogging.

  2. August 8, 2016 6:57 am

    Shared on Twitter. I’d prefer Strauss’s commentary, never read his material.

  3. August 8, 2016 9:21 am

    I’m most drawn to Matthew. I have always loved the Sermon on the Mount as a pinnacle of kingdom ethics, but also Matthew’s eschatology has always been intriguing.

  4. August 8, 2016 9:21 am

    I also tweeted the giveaway! https://twitter.com/JasonGardner79/status/762654526180626432

  5. August 9, 2016 9:47 am

    Matthew or Mark. Matthew because of Jonathan Pennington and Mark because of certain scenes like Jesus with the θηριων and Joel Marcus’ argument about Jesus’ cries from the cross have an exorcistic flavor (if I remember correctly).

    Tweeting. So chalk me up for two.

  6. August 9, 2016 10:35 am

    I often find myself returning to Matthew because it was really the first gospel I learned. Thus I keep returning since it is like an old friend that keeps me company.

  7. Kevin Walker permalink
    August 9, 2016 10:58 am

    Mark because of his detailed and yet poignant story telling.

  8. August 9, 2016 12:24 pm

    I’ve been most recently drawn to Luke for its depiction of Jesus as a zealous, apocalyptic prophet. I would love a copy of Strauss’s commentary on Mark, a gospel I do not currently own a commentary for.

  9. August 9, 2016 12:27 pm

    I love Luke for its apocalyptic portrayal of Jesus. I would love a copy of Strauss’s Mark.

  10. August 9, 2016 12:54 pm

    I feel myself most drawn to Matthew. As a younger Christian it was the first one I remember reading and wrestling with. So it was always my favorite because of that. I also love those sections with the Sermon on the Mount and the Beatitudes.

    Also here’s my share on Twitter: https://twitter.com/zaccleveland/status/763069134439538688

  11. August 9, 2016 1:07 pm

    Luke has been my recent favorite. I love its depiction of Jesus as an apocalyptic zealot. I would love a copy of Stauss’s commentary.

  12. August 11, 2016 9:54 am

    Golly. Good question. I like Luke’s emphasis on the poor. I feel I know more of the structure of the earlier parts of Matthew. I think John’s use of the theme of exaltation is brilliant. I like Mark’s emphasis on Jesus’s miracles as part of the good news. Overall, I think I like Luke most, but that might just be because we share a name!

    Tweeting, too.

  13. August 11, 2016 4:23 pm

    I feel drawn to Mark because of the fast tempo and because while many would say Jesus doesn’t “become” divine in early Christian though until John, Mark’s prologue and baptism reveal that even the earliest Gospel writer thought of Jesus as deity. This is especially clear in light of Isaiah 42 and Mark’s usage of it.

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